Yellow and Black by Konrad Marshall

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Vines

Site Immortal
Jun 9, 2008
13,611
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This summer will be my fourth reading of the book I thought was all about my time here on this forum. Alas, it mainly gave amazing insights into all the key movers and shakers at the club, both on and off field, during the Premiership run of 2017. 

I feel Marshall missed a real opportunity to explore Vines the man, the myth, the legend, and instead went for the money grabbing theme of an historic premiership year, cashing in on all the success starved Tigers fans desperate to read, watch and/or listen to anything remotely to do with the flag. 

The book concept of Vines is still there, waiting for the right author to take on what many believe to be the ultimate prize in literature.
 

Bones

Listed Player
Aug 8, 2016
577
25
28
Rather than a Nobel prize, I think you'd get something closer to:

"The climbing habit in plants has apparently evolved numerous times. Species that climb are well represented in habitats ranging from tropical rain forests through temperate forests to semi-deserts. The Biology of Vines, first published in 1991, is a treatment of what is known about climbing plants, written by a group of experts and covering topics ranging from the biomechanics of twining to silvicultural methods for controlling vine infestations. Also included are detailed accounts of climbing plant evolution, stem anatomy and function, climbing mechanics, carbon and water relations, reproductive ecology, the role of vines in forest communities and their economic importance. The chapters are based on research on herbaceous vines and woody climbers (lianas) in both temperate and tropical zones, deserts and rain-forests and Old and New World areas. Much remains to be learned about the biology of these plants, but this volume provides a substantial foundation upon which further research can be based."
 

Jools

Staff member
Assistant Coach
Sep 24, 2007
7,716
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Very good, both of you :D
I have just started reading it again, slower this time.